Wednesday, October 14, 2020

The inquisition Was Mostly About Perfidious Muslims

Neat little history lesson here having to do with the reason(s) for the Inquisition.  Recall that the Muslim horde conquered Spain in about 900 AD, and after a few hundred years of Muslim rule, the Spaniards fought back, pushing most Muslims back into North Africa.  The ones which remained in Spain were a rebellious lot, however....

...A final “Muslim uprising in 1499, and the crushing of this revolt in 1501, led to an edict that Muslims had to convert to Christianity or leave the peninsula.”  Contrary to popular belief, the motivation was less religious and more political; it was less about making Muslims “good Christians” and more about making them “good citizens.” So long as they remained Muslim, thereby operating under the highly divisive doctrine of “loyalty and enmity,” they would remain hostile and disloyal to Christian Spain; and because secularism, atheism, multiculturalism, or just general “wokeness,” were not options then, the only practical way Muslims could slough off their tribalism and fully participate in a Christian kingdom was by embracing its faith.

Under such circumstances, sharia is clear: Muslims should try to emigrate. But there has always been one important caveat: whenever Muslims find themselves under infidel authority, they may say and do almost anything—denounce Muhammad, receive baptism and communion, venerate the cross, all anathema to Islam—so long as their hearts remain true to Islam.

Such is the doctrine of taqiyya, which has traditionally defined Islam’s modus operandi under non-Muslim authority.  Even before the Reconquista in Spain, “Sunni Muslims had invoked taqiyya to justify dissimulation under Christian domination in other periods and regions, including Sicily after the Norman conquest in 1061–91 and the Byzantine Marches.”   Unsurprisingly, then, taqiyya defined Islam in post-Reconquista Spain; one authority refers to a 1504 fatwa urging Spain’s subject Muslims to employ taqiyya as “the key theological document for the study of Spanish Islam.”

Once the edict to convert or emigrate appeared, virtually the entire Granadan population—hundreds of thousands of Muslims—openly embraced Christianity but remained crypto-Muslims....

The remaining Musims (Moriscos) were gradually pressured to abandon their Muslim loyalties, which they did not.

...Thus, when a rumor arose in 1568 that the Ottoman Turks had finally come to liberate them, formerly “moderate” Muslims near Granada, “believing that the days under Christian rule were over, went berserk. Priests all over the countryside were attacked, mutilated, or murdered; some were burned alive; one was sewed inside a pig and barbequed; the pretty Christian girls were assiduously raped, some sent off to join the harems of Moroccan and Algerian potentates.”

In the end, if Muslims could never be loyal to infidel authority— constantly colluding and subverting, including with foreign Muslims—and if conversion to Christianity was no solution due to the dispensation of taqiyya, then only one solution remained: between 1609 and 1614, all Moriscos were expelled from the Peninsula to Africa, whence Islam had first invaded Spain nearly a millennium earlier....

Side note:  The Jews--no matter their propaganda--were 'bit players' compared to the Muslims.  Also note:  being expelled is not the same as being executed.

1 comment:

MSaul said...

Thanks to you, Dad29, for this historical work.
Good point you make here:
"Also note: being expelled is not the same as being executed."
True. The Latin 'exterminare' means to banish or expel, i.e., to put outside the boundaries (from 'ex' + 'terminus').