Thursday, June 29, 2006

DNR to Waukesha: Screw You

The City of Waukesha has a small problem.

Back a number of years ago, the EPA made a decision which was reckless and irresponsible even for EPA, declaring that Waukesha must reduce its drinking-water radium to 5 picocuries/liter--that greater amounts of radium "could cause cancer." Science from Wisconsin's leading research hospital/medical school (Froedtert) did not dissuade EPA, nor the Federal Courts--which have trampled the 9th/10th Amendments to the ground. I mean, what's another city or State or three?

But for EPA, that's par for the course. Reality has never really impinged on their plans for the planet.

Anyway, EPA passed the buck on enforcing the standards to DNR/Wisconsin--known in Wisconsin as the "Successor to the Stasi"--and DNR gave the City of Waukesha 5 years to fix it.

Time's up this fall.

Waukesha water folks complain that it takes a few years to 1) develop acceptable alternative plans; 2) acquire the necessary permits; 3) acquire the land; and 4) drill the wells/install the infrastructure piping, etc., etc., etc.

The Stasi's response: Screw You. Pay at OUR Window, here in Dzherzhinsky Square, $5,000.00/day.

In the meantime, thousands, if not TENS of thousands, of Waukesha water-drinkers are dying, with corpses littering the streets, and hospitals jamming oncology patients into lobbies and parking garages.

.....whaddya mean, you didn't notice?

2 comments:

Mike said...

I'm thinking a couple of bucks in Diamond Jim's warchest and the whole thing goes away.

Anonymous said...

This statement is laughable:

"Science from Wisconsin's leading research hospital/medical school (Froedtert)..."

What's the basis for this preposterous conclusion?

For comparison purposes, consider this single paragraph from the UW Medical School web site:

"University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health has the largest research commitment of any school or college on the UW-Madison campus, receiving more than $240 million in research support in fiscal 2004. Approximately 1,200 faculty members work in 25 departments and 18 centers and institutes, and have active research programs covering virtually every aspect of basic or clinical biomedical research. Internationally recognized centers include the UW Comprehensive Cancer Center and its associated McArdle Research Laboratory, former home of the late Howard Temin, the 1975 co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his discovery of reverse transcriptase."